Justice Studies - Criminal Justice

  1. Overview
  2. A.A.S., Justice
    Studies -
    Criminal Justice
  3. B.S., Justice
    Studies -
    Criminal Justice
  4. B.S., Justice
    Studies - Criminal
    Justice with a Minor
    in Information
    Technology
    Management
  5. B.S., Justice
    Studies - Criminal
    Justice with a
    Minor in
    Management
  6. B.S., Justice
    Studies -
    Criminal Justice
    with a Minor in
    Legal Studies

Minelia Gomez, Berkeley College student

Student Discovers Confidence in Herself and Path for Her Future at Berkeley College

 Antoinette Kassas, Berkeley College Justice Studies - Criminal Justice Student

 Student Follows In Her Mother's Footsteps on Educational Journey to Berkeley College

Student Atiyya Hatcher speaks about the engaging faculty at Berkeley's Newark location.

Look Who's Hiring Berkeley's Justice Studies - Criminal Justice Interns and Grads!

Cavalry Protective Services
Legal Aid Society
New York City Law Department
NYC HHS Office of Compliance
One Loss Prevention Group
Passaic County Superior Court
Queens County District Attorney
Shebell & Shebell LLC
U.S. Bail Department
White Plains Police Department

Learn the skills to help make the world more secure.

Berkeley College’s Bachelor’s and Associate’s degree programs in Justice Studies - Criminal Justice provide students with a comprehensive foundation in this important field. Armed with a combination of knowledge gained in the classroom and hands-on instruction from faculty with professional experience, graduates are prepared to enter a variety of careers in a wide range of organizations. Students take courses that focus on the theoretical, practical, technological, and management skills required for success in the field of criminal justice. Program-related group excursions and guest speakers from various areas of criminal justice are also an important part of the career-focused program.

Benefit from:

  • A curriculum that examines:
    • The causes of crime
    • Criminal law and procedure
    • The role of law enforcement
    • Forensic science
    • Research methods
  • Practical job preparation
  • Exciting courses in specialized areas, such as:
    • Terrorism
    • Cyber Crime
    • Global Security
    • Intelligence
    • Case Management
  • The opportunity to analyze emerging issues and focus studies in a single area such as policing or security
  • Valuable, practical experience through program-related, faculty-monitored internships or job-related assignments
  • A seamless transition between Associate’s and Bachelor’s degrees
Justice Studies - Criminal Justice A.A.S.

Berkeley College students participated in an ASIS Security Symposium held at the Bergen County Police Academy.

Justice Studies - Criminal Justice
Associate in Applied Science Degree (A.A.S.)

This program is offered online and at Brooklyn, New York City, White Plains, Newark, Paramus, Woodbridge, and Woodland Park.

 

 


A.A.S., Justice Studies - Criminal Justice 2015 Course Requirements

Justice Studies - Criminal Justice
Associate in Applied Science Degree (A.A.S.)

 

Course Requirements

MAJOR COURSES

Qtr. hrs. credit

4 Credit Hours

An introduction to the major institutions of justice in society. Topics include justice in a free society, the police, courts, correctional services, the balance of individual rights and public order, law and public policy, and factors affecting the future of the justice system.

 


4 Credit Hours

This course examines the nature and importance of communication within the criminal justice system. Students develop report writing skills and an understanding of the impact report writing has on the investigation and prosecution of crime, as well as on the administration of justice.

 


4 Credit Hours

An introduction to the methods and body of rules by which criminal law functions in a free society. Topics include the collection and handling of evidence in a crime, police procedure in regard to search and seizure, emergency police searches, vehicle searches, confessions, and arrest and interrogation procedures.

 


4 Credit Hours

An introduction to the study of criminal law. Students will learn about general categories of criminal law (felonies and misdemeanors) and the various defenses to criminal charges (alibi, justification, excuse, conspiracy, and legal insanity).

Prerequisite: JUS100

 


2 Credit Hours

An introduction to the fundamental concepts underlying technology in criminal justice. Topics include the concepts of technology; tactical information; strategic information; the application of technology in criminal justice to improve operational efficiency and effectiveness in order to implement community policing; situational crime prevention; and resource allocation.

Prerequisites: CIS115, JUS100

 


4 Credit Hours

Allows students to work in a position related to their course of study. Students integrate the skills and knowledge learned through their academic experiences and participate in focused online discussions and special online projects.

Prerequisite: BUS226

 


4 Credit Hours

An introduction to the history and traditions of American policing. Examines the role of the police in advancing justice in a democratic society. Topics include law enforcement operations and strategies, such as profiling, organizational structure, community affairs, the police use of force, and various major concerns in public policy.

 


4 Credit Hours

An introduction to the various causes of crime in a free society. Considers factors such as free will, biology, and other possible causes, such as DNA, nutrition, hormones, and subcultures of violence.

 


Justice Studies Elective*

4 credits



BUSINESS COURSES


4 Credit Hours

Explores the nature and scope of business, examines its component parts, and describes how businesses are organized and managed. Students will learn about the various internal and external forces that comprise our business and economic system.

 


2 Credit Hours24 Clock Hours

24

Explores career development opportunities and strategies. Stresses entry-level job requirements and upward career paths. Covers resume writing skills, interviewing techniques, and the importance of professionalism. Continues the student's orientation to Berkeley College’s computer framework, which includes content collection and compiling a professional ePortfolio.

 


4 Credit Hours

An introduction to computer technology with an emphasis on applications. Students learn how to use software packages, such as Microsoft Windows, Word, PowerPoint, and Excel. Includes an orientation to Berkeley College’s computer framework, which includes Blackboard, content collection, and portfolio development.

 


2 Credit Hours

Hands-on experience with well-known database management software applications, such as Microsoft Access. Topics include an introduction to database programming, multiple database files, query files, reports, and the planning, development, and implementation of database systems.

Prerequisite: CIS115

 




LIBERAL ARTS COURSES


4 Credit Hours

An introduction to expository writing through a comprehensive survey of forms of composition. Students are taught to use words with precision, and strengthen their understanding and application of grammatical and rhetorical principles. Students are encouraged to appreciate and incorporate the principles of academic and professional writing.

 


4 Credit Hours

Strengthens the writing, reading, and interpretive abilities introduced in ENG105. Encourages students to develop an appreciation and understanding of various works of literature, and utilize literature to enhance critical thinking and writing.

Prerequisite: ENG105

 


4 Credit Hours

Designed to help students improve oral communication skills. Emphasis is placed on identifying good and poor speech habits, techniques for improving speech, oral interpretation, effective speech planning and delivery, and interpersonal communication.

Prerequisite: ENG106

 


4 Credit Hours

A required course for first-quarter students that examines basic psychological concepts which can be helpful in adjusting to the college experience. Some of the subtopics covered include stress management, academic challenges, communication skills, time management, healthy relationships, positive thinking, conflict management, and balancing home/college/work.

 


4 Credit Hours

Introduction to the study of ethics and moral philosophy, including its historical development, the major figures within that history, and some of the ethical and moral issues that face us today. Introduces students to the ideas of great thinkers throughout history and encourages students’ own thinking on various ethical and moral issues.

 


4 Credit Hours

Examines the social institutions that shape and influence the behavior of the individual and groups in society, with emphasis on examining contemporary social problems. Topics include the foundation of the study of human social life, theories and methods of sociology, and basic sociological concepts.

 


4 Credit Hours48 Clock Hours

48

Examines the basic principles of psychology and their direct application to the understanding of human behavior. Topics include human development, learning, memory, thinking, intelligence, creativity, motivation, emotion, adjustment, perception, abnormal behavior, and therapy.

 


4 Credit Hours

An introduction to the application of science to law. Students are introduced to the field of forensic science through a hands-on approach to its applications to criminal investigations, with clear explanations of the techniques, abilities, and limitations of the modern crime laboratory and crime-scene analysis.

 


General Education Core Humanities Elective

4 credits


FREE ELECTIVES

8 credits




90 QUARTER CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION

In the final quarter most on-site courses are offered only during the late afternoon and early evening so as not to interfere with internships.

Eligibility for some internships required to obtain a Berkeley College degree and employment opportunities in fields related to this program may require candidates to meet specific health requirements or pass criminal background checks prescribed by law. Applicants for whom such requirements may be matters of concern are strongly advised to contact an Admissions counselor prior to enrolling in this program. Note that law enforcement jobs typically require the candidate to be physically and mentally fit and have a valid driver's license, a clean driving record, no felony criminal record, no domestic violence charges (felony or misdemeanor), no loan/credit card defaults, and the ability to be licensed (via your agency or department) to carry a firearm. A selection process involving qualifying examination and/or supplementary training may also be required. Job requirements for non-sworn personnel in criminal justice and related agencies vary.

*LAW240 can be used as a Justice Studies elective.

 


SAMPLE PROGRAM SEQUENCE

Justice Studies - Criminal Justice
Bachelor of Science Degree (B.S.)

This program is offered online and at Brooklyn, New York City, White Plains, Dover, Newark, Paramus, Woodbridge, and Woodland Park.

 

 


B.S., Justice Studies - Criminal Justice 2015 Course Requirements

Justice Studies - Criminal Justice
Bachelor of Science Degree (B.S.)

 

Course Requirements

MAJOR COURSES

Qtr. hrs. credit

4 Credit Hours

An introduction to the major institutions of justice in society. Topics include justice in a free society, the police, courts, correctional services, the balance of individual rights and public order, law and public policy, and factors affecting the future of the justice system.

 


4 Credit Hours

This course examines the nature and importance of communication within the criminal justice system. Students develop report writing skills and an understanding of the impact report writing has on the investigation and prosecution of crime, as well as on the administration of justice.

 


4 Credit Hours

An introduction to the methods and body of rules by which criminal law functions in a free society. Topics include the collection and handling of evidence in a crime, police procedure in regard to search and seizure, emergency police searches, vehicle searches, confessions, and arrest and interrogation procedures.

 


4 Credit Hours

An introduction to the study of criminal law. Students will learn about general categories of criminal law (felonies and misdemeanors) and the various defenses to criminal charges (alibi, justification, excuse, conspiracy, and legal insanity).

Prerequisite: JUS100

 


2 Credit Hours

An introduction to the fundamental concepts underlying technology in criminal justice. Topics include the concepts of technology; tactical information; strategic information; the application of technology in criminal justice to improve operational efficiency and effectiveness in order to implement community policing; situational crime prevention; and resource allocation.

Prerequisites: CIS115, JUS100

 


4 Credit Hours

An introduction to the history, structure, and procedures of the state and federal judicial systems. Topics include the roles and responsibilities of the district attorney, defense attorney, bailiff, judge, jury, and expert witness in determining guilt or innocence. Pretrial activities are also discussed, such as grand jury, preliminary hearings, and pleas.

Prerequisite: JUS100 or LAW100

 


4 Credit Hours

An introduction to the history and current state of corrections, probation, and parole in the United States. Topics include the roles of corrections, probation, and parole officers; different types of jails and prisons; restorative justice; community-based correctional models; and extra-institutional supervision of convicted offenders.

Prerequisite: JUS100

 


4 Credit Hours

An examination of academic research with particular attention to research designs, data collection, and sampling. This course will address the procedures and methods necessary to conduct a research study in criminal justice. Methodological problems and ethical issues will be considered in detail.

Prerequisite: JUS100

 


4 Credit Hours

Allows students to work in a position related to their course of study. Students integrate the skills and knowledge learned through their academic experiences and participate in focused online discussions and special online projects.

Prerequisite: BUS226

 


4 Credit Hours

An introduction to the history and traditions of American policing. Examines the role of the police in advancing justice in a democratic society. Topics include law enforcement operations and strategies, such as profiling, organizational structure, community affairs, the police use of force, and various major concerns in public policy.

 


4 Credit Hours

An introduction to the various causes of crime in a free society. Considers factors such as free will, biology, and other possible causes, such as DNA, nutrition, hormones, and subcultures of violence.

 


Justice Studies Electives*

16 credits



BUSINESS COURSES


4 Credit Hours

Explores the nature and scope of business, examines its component parts, and describes how businesses are organized and managed. Students will learn about the various internal and external forces that comprise our business and economic system.

 


2 Credit Hours24 Clock Hours

24

Explores career development opportunities and strategies. Stresses entry-level job requirements and upward career paths. Covers resume writing skills, interviewing techniques, and the importance of professionalism. Continues the student's orientation to Berkeley College’s computer framework, which includes content collection and compiling a professional ePortfolio.

 


4 Credit Hours

An introduction to computer technology with an emphasis on applications. Students learn how to use software packages, such as Microsoft Windows, Word, PowerPoint, and Excel. Includes an orientation to Berkeley College’s computer framework, which includes Blackboard, content collection, and portfolio development.

 


2 Credit Hours

Hands-on experience with well-known database management software applications, such as Microsoft Access. Topics include an introduction to database programming, multiple database files, query files, reports, and the planning, development, and implementation of database systems.

Prerequisite: CIS115

 




LIBERAL ARTS COURSES**


4 Credit Hours

An introduction to expository writing through a comprehensive survey of forms of composition. Students are taught to use words with precision, and strengthen their understanding and application of grammatical and rhetorical principles. Students are encouraged to appreciate and incorporate the principles of academic and professional writing.

 


4 Credit Hours

Strengthens the writing, reading, and interpretive abilities introduced in ENG105. Encourages students to develop an appreciation and understanding of various works of literature, and utilize literature to enhance critical thinking and writing.

Prerequisite: ENG105

 


4 Credit Hours

Designed to help students improve oral communication skills. Emphasis is placed on identifying good and poor speech habits, techniques for improving speech, oral interpretation, effective speech planning and delivery, and interpersonal communication.

Prerequisite: ENG106

 


4 Credit Hours

Explores a wide variety of professional and creative writing modes, from personal profiles to blogging and beyond. Students will build their reading, writing, and researching skills, while reinforcing the fundamental concepts and current developments associated with the areas of their respective majors.

Prerequisite: ENG106

 


4 Credit Hours

A required course for first-quarter students that examines basic psychological concepts which can be helpful in adjusting to the college experience. Some of the subtopics covered include stress management, academic challenges, communication skills, time management, healthy relationships, positive thinking, conflict management, and balancing home/college/work.

 


4 Credit Hours

Introduction to the study of ethics and moral philosophy, including its historical development, the major figures within that history, and some of the ethical and moral issues that face us today. Introduces students to the ideas of great thinkers throughout history and encourages students’ own thinking on various ethical and moral issues.

 


4 Credit Hours

Introduces students to solving problems by using geometric and algebraic approaches and appropriate technology. Topics include the Cartesian coordinate system, linear equations, absolute value, rational and exponential functions, systems of linear equations, and linear inequalities.

Prerequisite: CSK099 or placement

 


4 Credit Hours

An introduction to statistical methods and procedures. Students become acquainted with the collection, analysis, and presentation of quantitative data. Topics include basic concepts of probability, frequency distributions, binomial distributions, sampling theory, hypothesis testing, and regression and correlation.

Prerequisite: MAT211

 


4 Credit Hours

An introduction to the application of science to law. Students are introduced to the field of forensic science through a hands-on approach to its applications to criminal investigations, with clear explanations of the techniques, abilities, and limitations of the modern crime laboratory and crime-scene analysis.

 


4 Credit Hours

Examines the social institutions that shape and influence the behavior of the individual and groups in society, with emphasis on examining contemporary social problems. Topics include the foundation of the study of human social life, theories and methods of sociology, and basic sociological concepts.

 


4 Credit Hours

An overview of the American political system, the ideas that shaped it, and the conflicts that continue to redefine the relationship between people and political power.

 


4 Credit Hours48 Clock Hours

48

Examines the basic principles of psychology and their direct application to the understanding of human behavior. Topics include human development, learning, memory, thinking, intelligence, creativity, motivation, emotion, adjustment, perception, abnormal behavior, and therapy.

 


4 Credit Hours

Provides students with a comprehensive understanding of the misuse of legal and illegal psychoactive drugs. Explores the different control policies regarding the enforcement of the use, sale, and manufacture of illegal drugs. Fosters awareness concerning the effects of drugs on users, and the different dimensions in enforcing drug policy.

 


4 Credit Hours

Explores relationships between race, gender, and class. Examines reality in the determination of socioeconomic mobility, and analyzes the perceived role of race and gender in American society.

 


4 Credit Hours

Explores global trends that have impacted all societies. Emphasizes developing nations experiencing extensive technological and social change. Students examine case studies which focus on ethnic separatist and religious fundamentalist movements that emerge as rapid modernization processes erode traditional belief systems.

 


4 Credit Hours

Examines the criteria used to define abnormal behavior in specific cultural and historical contexts. Students gain an understanding of experiential and therapeutic responses to mental illness and a basic knowledge of the medical model as it applies to the diagnosis and treatment of psychological disorders.

 


Humanities Elective

4 credits


Mathematics/Science Elective

4 credits


Liberal Arts Electives

8 credits


General Education Core Humanities Elective

4 credits


General Education Core Mathematics/Science Elective

4 credits


FREE ELECTIVES

22 credits




180 QUARTER CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION

In the final quarter most on-site courses are offered only during the late afternoon and early evening so as not to interfere with internships.

*LAW240 and LAW310 can be used as Justice Studies Electives.

**24 Liberal Arts credits must be at the 300/400 level.

Eligibility for some internships required to obtain a Berkeley College degree and employment opportunities in fields related to this program may require candidates to meet specific health requirements or pass criminal background checks prescribed by law. Applicants for whom such requirements may be matters of concern are strongly advised to contact an Admissions counselor prior to enrolling in this program. Note that law enforcement jobs typically require the candidate to be physically and mentally fit and have a valid driver's license, a clean driving record, no felony criminal record, no domestic violence charges (felony or misdemeanor), no loan/credit card defaults, and the ability to be licensed (via your agency or department) to carry a firearm. A selection process involving qualifying examination and/or supplementary training may also be required. Job requirements for non-sworn personnel in criminal justice and related agencies vary.

 


SAMPLE PROGRAM SEQUENCE

Berkeley College students participated in a “Special Topics: Mock Trial” class

Berkeley College students participated in a “Special Topics: Mock Trial” class.

Justice Studies - Criminal Justice with a Minor in Information Technology Management
Bachelor of Science Degree (B.S.)

This program is offered online and at New York City and Woodland Park.

 

 


B.S., Justice Studies - Criminal Justice with a Minor in Information Technology Management 2015 Course Requirements

Justice Studies - Criminal Justice with a Minor in Information Technology Management
Bachelor of Science Degree (B.S.)

 

Course Requirements

MAJOR COURSES

Qtr. hrs. credit

4 Credit Hours

An introduction to the major institutions of justice in society. Topics include justice in a free society, the police, courts, correctional services, the balance of individual rights and public order, law and public policy, and factors affecting the future of the justice system.

 


4 Credit Hours

This course examines the nature and importance of communication within the criminal justice system. Students develop report writing skills and an understanding of the impact report writing has on the investigation and prosecution of crime, as well as on the administration of justice.

 


4 Credit Hours

An introduction to the methods and body of rules by which criminal law functions in a free society. Topics include the collection and handling of evidence in a crime, police procedure in regard to search and seizure, emergency police searches, vehicle searches, confessions, and arrest and interrogation procedures.

 


4 Credit Hours

An introduction to the study of criminal law. Students will learn about general categories of criminal law (felonies and misdemeanors) and the various defenses to criminal charges (alibi, justification, excuse, conspiracy, and legal insanity).

Prerequisite: JUS100

 


2 Credit Hours

An introduction to the fundamental concepts underlying technology in criminal justice. Topics include the concepts of technology; tactical information; strategic information; the application of technology in criminal justice to improve operational efficiency and effectiveness in order to implement community policing; situational crime prevention; and resource allocation.

Prerequisites: CIS115, JUS100

 


4 Credit Hours

An introduction to the history, structure, and procedures of the state and federal judicial systems. Topics include the roles and responsibilities of the district attorney, defense attorney, bailiff, judge, jury, and expert witness in determining guilt or innocence. Pretrial activities are also discussed, such as grand jury, preliminary hearings, and pleas.

Prerequisite: JUS100 or LAW100

 


4 Credit Hours

An introduction to the history and current state of corrections, probation, and parole in the United States. Topics include the roles of corrections, probation, and parole officers; different types of jails and prisons; restorative justice; community-based correctional models; and extra-institutional supervision of convicted offenders.

Prerequisite: JUS100

 


4 Credit Hours

An examination of academic research with particular attention to research designs, data collection, and sampling. This course will address the procedures and methods necessary to conduct a research study in criminal justice. Methodological problems and ethical issues will be considered in detail.

Prerequisite: JUS100

 


4 Credit Hours

Allows students to work in a position related to their course of study. Students integrate the skills and knowledge learned through their academic experiences and participate in focused online discussions and special online projects.

Prerequisite: BUS226

 


4 Credit Hours

An introduction to the history and traditions of American policing. Examines the role of the police in advancing justice in a democratic society. Topics include law enforcement operations and strategies, such as profiling, organizational structure, community affairs, the police use of force, and various major concerns in public policy.

 


4 Credit Hours

An introduction to the various causes of crime in a free society. Considers factors such as free will, biology, and other possible causes, such as DNA, nutrition, hormones, and subcultures of violence.

 


Justice Studies Electives*

12 credits



BUSINESS COURSES


4 Credit Hours

Explores the nature and scope of business, examines its component parts, and describes how businesses are organized and managed. Students will learn about the various internal and external forces that comprise our business and economic system.

 


2 Credit Hours24 Clock Hours

24

Explores career development opportunities and strategies. Stresses entry-level job requirements and upward career paths. Covers resume writing skills, interviewing techniques, and the importance of professionalism. Continues the student's orientation to Berkeley College’s computer framework, which includes content collection and compiling a professional ePortfolio.

 


4 Credit Hours

An introduction to computer technology with an emphasis on applications. Students learn how to use software packages, such as Microsoft Windows, Word, PowerPoint, and Excel. Includes an orientation to Berkeley College’s computer framework, which includes Blackboard, content collection, and portfolio development.

 


2 Credit Hours

Hands-on experience with well-known database management software applications, such as Microsoft Access. Topics include an introduction to database programming, multiple database files, query files, reports, and the planning, development, and implementation of database systems.

Prerequisite: CIS115

 


4 Credit Hours

Explores fundamental technical issues pertaining to computers and information technology. Introduces hardware and software components of an information system, their mutual relationship, dependency, and historical evolution.

 


4 Credit Hours

Introduces underlying concepts of data communications, telecommunications, and networking. Emphasizes terminology and technologies in networking environments, and provides a general overview of the field of networking.

 


4 Credit Hours

Provides an overview of the skills and knowledge necessary for the development and management of relational database systems. Topics include database creation, modeling structures, physical and logical components, accessing techniques, and SQL. Concepts are explored through the use of MS Access.

 


4 Credit Hours

Explores legal and ethical issues that pertain to information technology management, such as digital property rights, data protection, identity protection, individual privacy, and systems integrity.

 


4 Credit Hours

Explores database terminology and concepts, logical system organization, data models, entity concepts, and data manipulation through SQL. Students are introduced to concepts of database security, networking, and database access.

Prerequisite: ITM210

 




LIBERAL ARTS COURSES**


4 Credit Hours

An introduction to expository writing through a comprehensive survey of forms of composition. Students are taught to use words with precision, and strengthen their understanding and application of grammatical and rhetorical principles. Students are encouraged to appreciate and incorporate the principles of academic and professional writing.

 


4 Credit Hours

Strengthens the writing, reading, and interpretive abilities introduced in ENG105. Encourages students to develop an appreciation and understanding of various works of literature, and utilize literature to enhance critical thinking and writing.

Prerequisite: ENG105

 


4 Credit Hours

Designed to help students improve oral communication skills. Emphasis is placed on identifying good and poor speech habits, techniques for improving speech, oral interpretation, effective speech planning and delivery, and interpersonal communication.

Prerequisite: ENG106

 


4 Credit Hours

Explores a wide variety of professional and creative writing modes, from personal profiles to blogging and beyond. Students will build their reading, writing, and researching skills, while reinforcing the fundamental concepts and current developments associated with the areas of their respective majors.

Prerequisite: ENG106

 


4 Credit Hours

A required course for first-quarter students that examines basic psychological concepts which can be helpful in adjusting to the college experience. Some of the subtopics covered include stress management, academic challenges, communication skills, time management, healthy relationships, positive thinking, conflict management, and balancing home/college/work.

 


4 Credit Hours

Introduction to the study of ethics and moral philosophy, including its historical development, the major figures within that history, and some of the ethical and moral issues that face us today. Introduces students to the ideas of great thinkers throughout history and encourages students’ own thinking on various ethical and moral issues.

 


4 Credit Hours

Introduces students to solving problems by using geometric and algebraic approaches and appropriate technology. Topics include the Cartesian coordinate system, linear equations, absolute value, rational and exponential functions, systems of linear equations, and linear inequalities.

Prerequisite: CSK099 or placement

 


4 Credit Hours

An introduction to statistical methods and procedures. Students become acquainted with the collection, analysis, and presentation of quantitative data. Topics include basic concepts of probability, frequency distributions, binomial distributions, sampling theory, hypothesis testing, and regression and correlation.

Prerequisite: MAT211

 


4 Credit Hours

An introduction to the application of science to law. Students are introduced to the field of forensic science through a hands-on approach to its applications to criminal investigations, with clear explanations of the techniques, abilities, and limitations of the modern crime laboratory and crime-scene analysis.

 


4 Credit Hours

Examines the social institutions that shape and influence the behavior of the individual and groups in society, with emphasis on examining contemporary social problems. Topics include the foundation of the study of human social life, theories and methods of sociology, and basic sociological concepts.

 


4 Credit Hours

An overview of the American political system, the ideas that shaped it, and the conflicts that continue to redefine the relationship between people and political power.

 


4 Credit Hours48 Clock Hours

48

Examines the basic principles of psychology and their direct application to the understanding of human behavior. Topics include human development, learning, memory, thinking, intelligence, creativity, motivation, emotion, adjustment, perception, abnormal behavior, and therapy.

 


4 Credit Hours

Provides students with a comprehensive understanding of the misuse of legal and illegal psychoactive drugs. Explores the different control policies regarding the enforcement of the use, sale, and manufacture of illegal drugs. Fosters awareness concerning the effects of drugs on users, and the different dimensions in enforcing drug policy.

 


4 Credit Hours

Explores relationships between race, gender, and class. Examines reality in the determination of socioeconomic mobility, and analyzes the perceived role of race and gender in American society.

 


4 Credit Hours

Explores global trends that have impacted all societies. Emphasizes developing nations experiencing extensive technological and social change. Students examine case studies which focus on ethnic separatist and religious fundamentalist movements that emerge as rapid modernization processes erode traditional belief systems.

 


4 Credit Hours

Examines the criteria used to define abnormal behavior in specific cultural and historical contexts. Students gain an understanding of experiential and therapeutic responses to mental illness and a basic knowledge of the medical model as it applies to the diagnosis and treatment of psychological disorders.

 


Humanities Elective

4 credits


Mathematics/Science Elective

4 credits


Liberal Arts Electives

8 credits


General Education Core Humanities Elective

4 credits


General Education Core Mathematics/Science Elective

4 credits


FREE ELECTIVES

6 credits




180 QUARTER CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION

In the final quarter most on-site courses are offered only during the late afternoon and early evening so as not to interfere with internships.

*LAW240 and LAW310 can be used as Justice Studies Electives.

**24 Liberal Arts credits must be at the 300/400 level.

Eligibility for some internships required to obtain a Berkeley College degree and employment opportunities in fields related to this program may require candidates to meet specific health requirements or pass criminal background checks prescribed by law. Applicants for whom such requirements may be matters of concern are strongly advised to contact an Admissions counselor prior to enrolling in this program. Note that law enforcement jobs typically require the candidate to be physically and mentally fit and have a valid driver's license, a clean driving record, no felony criminal record, no domestic violence charges (felony or misdemeanor), no loan/credit card defaults, and the ability to be licensed (via your agency or department) to carry a firearm. A selection process involving qualifying examination and/or supplementary training may also be required. Job requirements for non-sworn personnel in criminal justice and related agencies vary.

 


SAMPLE PROGRAM SEQUENCE

Justice Studies - Criminal Justice with a Minor in Management
Bachelor of Science Degree (B.S.)

This program is offered online and at Brooklyn, New York City, White Plains, Dover, Newark, Paramus, Woodbridge, and Woodland Park.

 

 


B.S., Justice Studies - Criminal Justice with a Minor in Management 2015 Course Requirements

Justice Studies - Criminal Justice with a Minor in Legal Studies
Bachelor of Science Degree (B.S.)

 

Course Requirements

MAJOR COURSES

Qtr. hrs. credit

4 Credit Hours

An introduction to the major institutions of justice in society. Topics include justice in a free society, the police, courts, correctional services, the balance of individual rights and public order, law and public policy, and factors affecting the future of the justice system.

 


4 Credit Hours

This course examines the nature and importance of communication within the criminal justice system. Students develop report writing skills and an understanding of the impact report writing has on the investigation and prosecution of crime, as well as on the administration of justice.

 


4 Credit Hours

An introduction to the methods and body of rules by which criminal law functions in a free society. Topics include the collection and handling of evidence in a crime, police procedure in regard to search and seizure, emergency police searches, vehicle searches, confessions, and arrest and interrogation procedures.

 


4 Credit Hours

An introduction to the study of criminal law. Students will learn about general categories of criminal law (felonies and misdemeanors) and the various defenses to criminal charges (alibi, justification, excuse, conspiracy, and legal insanity).

Prerequisite: JUS100

 


2 Credit Hours

An introduction to the fundamental concepts underlying technology in criminal justice. Topics include the concepts of technology; tactical information; strategic information; the application of technology in criminal justice to improve operational efficiency and effectiveness in order to implement community policing; situational crime prevention; and resource allocation.

Prerequisites: CIS115, JUS100

 


4 Credit Hours

An introduction to the history, structure, and procedures of the state and federal judicial systems. Topics include the roles and responsibilities of the district attorney, defense attorney, bailiff, judge, jury, and expert witness in determining guilt or innocence. Pretrial activities are also discussed, such as grand jury, preliminary hearings, and pleas.

Prerequisite: JUS100 or LAW100

 


4 Credit Hours

An introduction to the history and current state of corrections, probation, and parole in the United States. Topics include the roles of corrections, probation, and parole officers; different types of jails and prisons; restorative justice; community-based correctional models; and extra-institutional supervision of convicted offenders.

Prerequisite: JUS100

 


4 Credit Hours

An examination of academic research with particular attention to research designs, data collection, and sampling. This course will address the procedures and methods necessary to conduct a research study in criminal justice. Methodological problems and ethical issues will be considered in detail.

Prerequisite: JUS100

 


4 Credit Hours

Allows students to work in a position related to their course of study. Students integrate the skills and knowledge learned through their academic experiences and participate in focused online discussions and special online projects.

Prerequisite: BUS226

 


4 Credit Hours

Students will locate and identify primary and secondary sources of law using traditional and computer-assisted research techniques, including Lexis, Westlaw, and the Internet. Students will use the databases to formulate searches, retrieve and display documents, and validate findings.

Prerequisite: LAW100 or BUS231 or JUS100

 


4 Credit Hours

Students will be introduced to the rules governing the civil litigation process in both the state and federal civil courts. Topics will include all aspects of civil litigation, including preparation of pleadings, discovery methods, motion practice, trial documents, and the appellate process.

Prerequisite: LAW100 or BUS231

 


4 Credit Hours

This course will explore the field of Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) by exploring the various mechanisms utilized to resolve disputes, including mediation and arbitration; the advantages and disadvantages of utilizing ADR as opposed to litigation; as well as the types and subjects where ADR is commonly employed. Students will engage in role plays throughout the course to demonstrate their knowledge of the various ADR options.

Prerequisite: LAW100 or BUS231 or JUS100

 


4 Credit Hours

An introduction to the history and traditions of American policing. Examines the role of the police in advancing justice in a democratic society. Topics include law enforcement operations and strategies, such as profiling, organizational structure, community affairs, the police use of force, and various major concerns in public policy.

 


4 Credit Hours

An introduction to the various causes of crime in a free society. Considers factors such as free will, biology, and other possible causes, such as DNA, nutrition, hormones, and subcultures of violence.

 


Justice Studies and Legal Electives

16 credits



BUSINESS COURSES


4 Credit Hours

Explores the nature and scope of business, examines its component parts, and describes how businesses are organized and managed. Students will learn about the various internal and external forces that comprise our business and economic system.

 


2 Credit Hours24 Clock Hours

24

Explores career development opportunities and strategies. Stresses entry-level job requirements and upward career paths. Covers resume writing skills, interviewing techniques, and the importance of professionalism. Continues the student's orientation to Berkeley College’s computer framework, which includes content collection and compiling a professional ePortfolio.

 


4 Credit Hours

Provides students with detailed knowledge of the laws relating to contracts, commerce, property, sales, negotiable instruments, and employment. Students develop an awareness of business situations requiring legal counsel and a familiarization with the overall structure of the legal system.

 


4 Credit Hours

An introduction to computer technology with an emphasis on applications. Students learn how to use software packages, such as Microsoft Windows, Word, PowerPoint, and Excel. Includes an orientation to Berkeley College’s computer framework, which includes Blackboard, content collection, and portfolio development.

 


2 Credit Hours

Hands-on experience with well-known database management software applications, such as Microsoft Access. Topics include an introduction to database programming, multiple database files, query files, reports, and the planning, development, and implementation of database systems.

Prerequisite: CIS115

 




LIBERAL ARTS COURSES*


4 Credit Hours

An introduction to expository writing through a comprehensive survey of forms of composition. Students are taught to use words with precision, and strengthen their understanding and application of grammatical and rhetorical principles. Students are encouraged to appreciate and incorporate the principles of academic and professional writing.

 


4 Credit Hours

Strengthens the writing, reading, and interpretive abilities introduced in ENG105. Encourages students to develop an appreciation and understanding of various works of literature, and utilize literature to enhance critical thinking and writing.

Prerequisite: ENG105

 


4 Credit Hours

Designed to help students improve oral communication skills. Emphasis is placed on identifying good and poor speech habits, techniques for improving speech, oral interpretation, effective speech planning and delivery, and interpersonal communication.

Prerequisite: ENG106

 


4 Credit Hours

Explores a wide variety of professional and creative writing modes, from personal profiles to blogging and beyond. Students will build their reading, writing, and researching skills, while reinforcing the fundamental concepts and current developments associated with the areas of their respective majors.

Prerequisite: ENG106

 


4 Credit Hours

A required course for first-quarter students that examines basic psychological concepts which can be helpful in adjusting to the college experience. Some of the subtopics covered include stress management, academic challenges, communication skills, time management, healthy relationships, positive thinking, conflict management, and balancing home/college/work.

 


4 Credit Hours

Introduction to the study of ethics and moral philosophy, including its historical development, the major figures within that history, and some of the ethical and moral issues that face us today. Introduces students to the ideas of great thinkers throughout history and encourages students’ own thinking on various ethical and moral issues.

 


4 Credit Hours

Introduces students to solving problems by using geometric and algebraic approaches and appropriate technology. Topics include the Cartesian coordinate system, linear equations, absolute value, rational and exponential functions, systems of linear equations, and linear inequalities.

Prerequisite: CSK099 or placement

 


4 Credit Hours

An introduction to statistical methods and procedures. Students become acquainted with the collection, analysis, and presentation of quantitative data. Topics include basic concepts of probability, frequency distributions, binomial distributions, sampling theory, hypothesis testing, and regression and correlation.

Prerequisite: MAT211

 


4 Credit Hours

An introduction to the application of science to law. Students are introduced to the field of forensic science through a hands-on approach to its applications to criminal investigations, with clear explanations of the techniques, abilities, and limitations of the modern crime laboratory and crime-scene analysis.

 


4 Credit Hours

Examines the social institutions that shape and influence the behavior of the individual and groups in society, with emphasis on examining contemporary social problems. Topics include the foundation of the study of human social life, theories and methods of sociology, and basic sociological concepts.

 


4 Credit Hours

An overview of the American political system, the ideas that shaped it, and the conflicts that continue to redefine the relationship between people and political power.

 


4 Credit Hours48 Clock Hours

48

Examines the basic principles of psychology and their direct application to the understanding of human behavior. Topics include human development, learning, memory, thinking, intelligence, creativity, motivation, emotion, adjustment, perception, abnormal behavior, and therapy.

 


4 Credit Hours

Provides students with a comprehensive understanding of the misuse of legal and illegal psychoactive drugs. Explores the different control policies regarding the enforcement of the use, sale, and manufacture of illegal drugs. Fosters awareness concerning the effects of drugs on users, and the different dimensions in enforcing drug policy.

 


4 Credit Hours

Explores relationships between race, gender, and class. Examines reality in the determination of socioeconomic mobility, and analyzes the perceived role of race and gender in American society.

 


4 Credit Hours

Explores global trends that have impacted all societies. Emphasizes developing nations experiencing extensive technological and social change. Students examine case studies which focus on ethnic separatist and religious fundamentalist movements that emerge as rapid modernization processes erode traditional belief systems.

 


4 Credit Hours

Examines the criteria used to define abnormal behavior in specific cultural and historical contexts. Students gain an understanding of experiential and therapeutic responses to mental illness and a basic knowledge of the medical model as it applies to the diagnosis and treatment of psychological disorders.

 


Humanities Electives

8 credits


Mathematics/Science Elective

4 credits


Liberal Arts Electives

8 credits


General Education Core Humanities Elective

4 credits


General Education Core Mathematics/Science Elective

4 credits


FREE ELECTIVE

2 credits




180 QUARTER CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION

In the final quarter most on-site courses are offered only during the late afternoon and early evening so as not to interfere with internships.

*24 Liberal Arts credits must be at the 300/400 level.

Eligibility for some internships required to obtain a Berkeley College degree and employment opportunities in fields related to this program may require candidates to meet specific health requirements or pass criminal background checks prescribed by law. Applicants for whom such requirements may be matters of concern are strongly advised to contact an Admissions counselor prior to enrolling in this program. Note that law enforcement jobs typically require the candidate to be physically and mentally fit and have a valid driver's license, a clean driving record, no felony criminal record, no domestic violence charges (felony or misdemeanor), no loan/credit card defaults, and the ability to be licensed (via your agency or department) to carry a firearm. A selection process involving qualifying examination and/or supplementary training may also be required. Job requirements for non-sworn personnel in criminal justice and related agencies vary.

 


SAMPLE PROGRAM SEQUENCE

Justice Studies - Criminal Justice with a Minor in Legal Studies
Bachelor of Science (B.S.)

This program is offered online and at Brooklyn, New York City, Dover, Newark, Woodbridge, and Woodland Park.

 

 


B.S., Justice Studies - Criminal Justice with a Minor in Legal Studies 2015 Course Requirements

Justice Studies - Criminal Justice with a Minor in Legal Studies
Bachelor of Science Degree (B.S.)

 

Course Requirements

MAJOR COURSES

Qtr. hrs. credit

4 Credit Hours

An introduction to the major institutions of justice in society. Topics include justice in a free society, the police, courts, correctional services, the balance of individual rights and public order, law and public policy, and factors affecting the future of the justice system.

 


4 Credit Hours

This course examines the nature and importance of communication within the criminal justice system. Students develop report writing skills and an understanding of the impact report writing has on the investigation and prosecution of crime, as well as on the administration of justice.

 


4 Credit Hours

An introduction to the methods and body of rules by which criminal law functions in a free society. Topics include the collection and handling of evidence in a crime, police procedure in regard to search and seizure, emergency police searches, vehicle searches, confessions, and arrest and interrogation procedures.

 


4 Credit Hours

An introduction to the study of criminal law. Students will learn about general categories of criminal law (felonies and misdemeanors) and the various defenses to criminal charges (alibi, justification, excuse, conspiracy, and legal insanity).

Prerequisite: JUS100

 


2 Credit Hours

An introduction to the fundamental concepts underlying technology in criminal justice. Topics include the concepts of technology; tactical information; strategic information; the application of technology in criminal justice to improve operational efficiency and effectiveness in order to implement community policing; situational crime prevention; and resource allocation.

Prerequisites: CIS115, JUS100

 


4 Credit Hours

An introduction to the history, structure, and procedures of the state and federal judicial systems. Topics include the roles and responsibilities of the district attorney, defense attorney, bailiff, judge, jury, and expert witness in determining guilt or innocence. Pretrial activities are also discussed, such as grand jury, preliminary hearings, and pleas.

Prerequisite: JUS100 or LAW100

 


4 Credit Hours

An introduction to the history and current state of corrections, probation, and parole in the United States. Topics include the roles of corrections, probation, and parole officers; different types of jails and prisons; restorative justice; community-based correctional models; and extra-institutional supervision of convicted offenders.

Prerequisite: JUS100

 


4 Credit Hours

An examination of academic research with particular attention to research designs, data collection, and sampling. This course will address the procedures and methods necessary to conduct a research study in criminal justice. Methodological problems and ethical issues will be considered in detail.

Prerequisite: JUS100

 


4 Credit Hours

Allows students to work in a position related to their course of study. Students integrate the skills and knowledge learned through their academic experiences and participate in focused online discussions and special online projects.

Prerequisite: BUS226

 


4 Credit Hours

Students will locate and identify primary and secondary sources of law using traditional and computer-assisted research techniques, including Lexis, Westlaw, and the Internet. Students will use the databases to formulate searches, retrieve and display documents, and validate findings.

Prerequisite: LAW100 or BUS231 or JUS100

 


4 Credit Hours

Students will be introduced to the rules governing the civil litigation process in both the state and federal civil courts. Topics will include all aspects of civil litigation, including preparation of pleadings, discovery methods, motion practice, trial documents, and the appellate process.

Prerequisite: LAW100 or BUS231

 


4 Credit Hours

This course will explore the field of Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) by exploring the various mechanisms utilized to resolve disputes, including mediation and arbitration; the advantages and disadvantages of utilizing ADR as opposed to litigation; as well as the types and subjects where ADR is commonly employed. Students will engage in role plays throughout the course to demonstrate their knowledge of the various ADR options.

Prerequisite: LAW100 or BUS231 or JUS100

 


4 Credit Hours

An introduction to the history and traditions of American policing. Examines the role of the police in advancing justice in a democratic society. Topics include law enforcement operations and strategies, such as profiling, organizational structure, community affairs, the police use of force, and various major concerns in public policy.

 


4 Credit Hours

An introduction to the various causes of crime in a free society. Considers factors such as free will, biology, and other possible causes, such as DNA, nutrition, hormones, and subcultures of violence.

 


Justice Studies and Legal Electives

16 credits



BUSINESS COURSES


4 Credit Hours

Explores the nature and scope of business, examines its component parts, and describes how businesses are organized and managed. Students will learn about the various internal and external forces that comprise our business and economic system.

 


2 Credit Hours24 Clock Hours

24

Explores career development opportunities and strategies. Stresses entry-level job requirements and upward career paths. Covers resume writing skills, interviewing techniques, and the importance of professionalism. Continues the student's orientation to Berkeley College’s computer framework, which includes content collection and compiling a professional ePortfolio.

 


4 Credit Hours

Provides students with detailed knowledge of the laws relating to contracts, commerce, property, sales, negotiable instruments, and employment. Students develop an awareness of business situations requiring legal counsel and a familiarization with the overall structure of the legal system.

 


4 Credit Hours

An introduction to computer technology with an emphasis on applications. Students learn how to use software packages, such as Microsoft Windows, Word, PowerPoint, and Excel. Includes an orientation to Berkeley College’s computer framework, which includes Blackboard, content collection, and portfolio development.

 


2 Credit Hours

Hands-on experience with well-known database management software applications, such as Microsoft Access. Topics include an introduction to database programming, multiple database files, query files, reports, and the planning, development, and implementation of database systems.

Prerequisite: CIS115

 




LIBERAL ARTS COURSES*


4 Credit Hours

An introduction to expository writing through a comprehensive survey of forms of composition. Students are taught to use words with precision, and strengthen their understanding and application of grammatical and rhetorical principles. Students are encouraged to appreciate and incorporate the principles of academic and professional writing.

 


4 Credit Hours

Strengthens the writing, reading, and interpretive abilities introduced in ENG105. Encourages students to develop an appreciation and understanding of various works of literature, and utilize literature to enhance critical thinking and writing.

Prerequisite: ENG105

 


4 Credit Hours

Designed to help students improve oral communication skills. Emphasis is placed on identifying good and poor speech habits, techniques for improving speech, oral interpretation, effective speech planning and delivery, and interpersonal communication.

Prerequisite: ENG106

 


4 Credit Hours

Explores a wide variety of professional and creative writing modes, from personal profiles to blogging and beyond. Students will build their reading, writing, and researching skills, while reinforcing the fundamental concepts and current developments associated with the areas of their respective majors.

Prerequisite: ENG106

 


4 Credit Hours

A required course for first-quarter students that examines basic psychological concepts which can be helpful in adjusting to the college experience. Some of the subtopics covered include stress management, academic challenges, communication skills, time management, healthy relationships, positive thinking, conflict management, and balancing home/college/work.

 


4 Credit Hours

Introduction to the study of ethics and moral philosophy, including its historical development, the major figures within that history, and some of the ethical and moral issues that face us today. Introduces students to the ideas of great thinkers throughout history and encourages students’ own thinking on various ethical and moral issues.

 


4 Credit Hours

Introduces students to solving problems by using geometric and algebraic approaches and appropriate technology. Topics include the Cartesian coordinate system, linear equations, absolute value, rational and exponential functions, systems of linear equations, and linear inequalities.

Prerequisite: CSK099 or placement

 


4 Credit Hours

An introduction to statistical methods and procedures. Students become acquainted with the collection, analysis, and presentation of quantitative data. Topics include basic concepts of probability, frequency distributions, binomial distributions, sampling theory, hypothesis testing, and regression and correlation.

Prerequisite: MAT211

 


4 Credit Hours

An introduction to the application of science to law. Students are introduced to the field of forensic science through a hands-on approach to its applications to criminal investigations, with clear explanations of the techniques, abilities, and limitations of the modern crime laboratory and crime-scene analysis.

 


4 Credit Hours

Examines the social institutions that shape and influence the behavior of the individual and groups in society, with emphasis on examining contemporary social problems. Topics include the foundation of the study of human social life, theories and methods of sociology, and basic sociological concepts.

 


4 Credit Hours

An overview of the American political system, the ideas that shaped it, and the conflicts that continue to redefine the relationship between people and political power.

 


4 Credit Hours48 Clock Hours

48

Examines the basic principles of psychology and their direct application to the understanding of human behavior. Topics include human development, learning, memory, thinking, intelligence, creativity, motivation, emotion, adjustment, perception, abnormal behavior, and therapy.

 


4 Credit Hours

Provides students with a comprehensive understanding of the misuse of legal and illegal psychoactive drugs. Explores the different control policies regarding the enforcement of the use, sale, and manufacture of illegal drugs. Fosters awareness concerning the effects of drugs on users, and the different dimensions in enforcing drug policy.

 


4 Credit Hours

Explores relationships between race, gender, and class. Examines reality in the determination of socioeconomic mobility, and analyzes the perceived role of race and gender in American society.

 


4 Credit Hours

Explores global trends that have impacted all societies. Emphasizes developing nations experiencing extensive technological and social change. Students examine case studies which focus on ethnic separatist and religious fundamentalist movements that emerge as rapid modernization processes erode traditional belief systems.

 


4 Credit Hours

Examines the criteria used to define abnormal behavior in specific cultural and historical contexts. Students gain an understanding of experiential and therapeutic responses to mental illness and a basic knowledge of the medical model as it applies to the diagnosis and treatment of psychological disorders.

 


Humanities Electives

8 credits


Mathematics/Science Elective

4 credits


Liberal Arts Electives

8 credits


General Education Core Humanities Elective

4 credits


General Education Core Mathematics/Science Elective

4 credits


FREE ELECTIVE

2 credits




180 QUARTER CREDIT HOURS REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION

In the final quarter most on-site courses are offered only during the late afternoon and early evening so as not to interfere with internships.

*24 Liberal Arts credits must be at the 300/400 level.

Eligibility for some internships required to obtain a Berkeley College degree and employment opportunities in fields related to this program may require candidates to meet specific health requirements or pass criminal background checks prescribed by law. Applicants for whom such requirements may be matters of concern are strongly advised to contact an Admissions counselor prior to enrolling in this program. Note that law enforcement jobs typically require the candidate to be physically and mentally fit and have a valid driver's license, a clean driving record, no felony criminal record, no domestic violence charges (felony or misdemeanor), no loan/credit card defaults, and the ability to be licensed (via your agency or department) to carry a firearm. A selection process involving qualifying examination and/or supplementary training may also be required. Job requirements for non-sworn personnel in criminal justice and related agencies vary.

 


SAMPLE PROGRAM SEQUENCE